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PINDAH*, The sequel

By popular demand.  The second edition of “the glossy with an Indo Dutch touch”.  Immediately after the release of the first issue, there was a high demand for a sequel.  Once-only stood in the way of completeness.  The hunger for our Dutch East Indies heritage turned out to be very much alive.  An online survey confirmed this picture.  There was no other way, they had to continue.
Not only the second, third and fourth generations of the Indo Dutch Community had been awakened, the rest of the Netherlands and even here in SOCAL was also interested in this “largest and quietest minority”.  It has been understood from readers that the magazine has often been given as a gift to parents and grandparents.  The magazine was read or even read together.  Many questions from children and grandchildren were finally answered by the articles.  Especially by the proud grandparents who unfortunately are tested again in this difficult time for their resilience and adaptability.

The umpteenth adjustment.  Our (grand) parents moved to the Netherlands years ago.  Not because it was possible, but because they had to.  The new title of the glossy is therefore PINDAH * which means “To Move” in Bahasa Indonesia, pronounce “PEEN-DAH”...

This new PINDAH * reflects the diversity and inclusiveness of the Indo Dutch Community: stories about the Bersiap, seventy years of RMS, Decolonization, Backpay claims, the grief of the Papuans.  A mix in which no ingredient should dominate, as Kirsten Goote-Vos states in her interview: “If you want to make a good Soto, you have to be able to smell all the ingredients, nothing should dominate.  They must all come into their own. ”

The role of youth is essential to preserve our heritage.  Essential for the transfer of knowledge and information.  Hence a lot of attention in this PINDAH * for the third generation.  Young people who, as NRC journalist (NRC is one of The Netherlands major newspapers) Yaël Vinckx remarks in her contribution, can play an important role in passing on the stories because of their open-minded question to the elderly.  Because that’s what it’s about.  PINDAH * is very happy with the interviews with DJ Don Diablo, poet Ellen Deckwitz, the writing couple Auke Kok and Dido Michielsen and a number of SOCAL INDOS. They are very open about their own background and sources of inspiration.  Columnist and publicist Theodor Holman,  journalists Marc Chavannes and Hans Moll refer to their youth, what they have heard and seen and how those experiences have shaped them.

Read how deeply the Dutch East Indies is anchored in Yvonne Keuls, about the time Xaviera Hollander spent in a Japanese camp.  And how Louise Doorman writes about her grandfather Karel Doorman.

Of course also attention for entertainment: the Indo Dutch kitchen, an update of the latest Indo and Moluccan books, lifestyle according to Miss Sunny, art with Frans Leidelmeijer and much more.

In 2020, 75 years of freedom will be celebrated – some will celebrate on May 5, others on August 15, and for a third group there will be nothing to celebrate.  However, during the current Corona crisis, we all realize that being “free” doesn’t exist without security.  And that safety comes first, especially now.  Because otherwise there is nothing to commemorate.

PINDAH* deserves a place next to MOESSON “Het Indisch Maandblad” and the more than famous yellow booklet DE INDO created by our one and only SOCAI INDO Oom Rene Creutzburg.
CLICK HERE  to order your online PINDAH* Magazine : 
https://www.pindah-magazine.nl/winkelmand/
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What is an Indo and who is an Indo?

We Indo people or Indos, Dutch Indonesians, Indo-Dutch, or Dutch-Indos consist of Europeans, Asians, and persons of mixed European–Asian blood and we Indo people have been part and experienced the colonial culture of the former Dutch East Indies. 

We are Indo’s, not equal, but more different. We are sober and magic. We eat Indonesian food, but also Dutch stew. Some of us are brown with blue eyes; others are blond with black eyes. We are not half Dutch and half Indonesian or whatever you might think. We are something special with our own culture. I do not go along with those who say that we need to adapt to the Dutch or the Indonesian culture; integrate yes, but never assimilate. We are different and ourselves; unique. I am not Dutch or Indonesian. I am an Indo with a particular culture and history. And the Dutch, Indonesians and any other culture must respect that. An Indo culture in all its individuality and uniqueness!  

This post is authored by Ronny Geenen and originally appeared on My Indo World.

Read the full story here:  www.MyIndoWorld.com